Thank you! And happy new year.

 

To all of our supporters,

THANK YOU.

Your support in 2020 meant that, despite unimaginable obstacles, we were still able to plant trees + grow community.

What a year.

So many people supported us in so many ways, it has often brought me to tears. Your commitment is real and I thank you for that.

Your support plants trees in neighborhoods and natural areas while bringing people together and building resilience in our communities.

We can’t do this without you!

Here’s to a tree-filled 2021,

Whitney Dorer, Interim Executive Director

PS: Plant trees with us! When we are planting we are doing so with a number of health and safety features in place to ensure our events are as safe as possible. Check out our events calendar for the latest information about our community tree planting events – and how to get involved!

Tis the season … for Give!Guide

The 2020 Give!Guide is here!

Willamette Week’s Give!Guide runs through December 31st and is a great way to learn about organizations that are doing amazing work on behalf of people, places, critters and causes (including trees + community, of course ;).

G!G features Big Give Days when donors are entered to win fabulous incentives like shopping sprees, vacation packages, and more.

Why give? Now more than ever, we need trees! They fight climate change, clean our air and water, and make this place beautiful. And when planted the Friends of Trees way, with all kinds of volunteers, trees grow community (ands we need that more than ever, too!).

Thank you for helping us plant trees together!

On Giving Tuesday we give trees

 

Tree Walks & Tree Talks – LIVE for Giving Tuesday & Give!Guide on December 1

Because we love giving, we love Give!Guide, we love #GivingTuesday, we love our Give!Guide partners HotLips Pizza & Level Beer, we love the Giving Tuesday Give!Guide sponser New Seasons Market, we love our volunteers & supporters – so! much! love! – we’re sharing the thing we also love with you: trees.

This Giving Tuesday we’re giving you a day full of tree walks and tree talks LIVE on Instagram (and posted to Facebook and tweeted soon after), and it’s a great day to give (more about today’s amazing Give!Guide raffle below the agenda).

 

What time?
What’s the topic?
 Who’s on?
 Where will they be?
10:00 a.m.Volunteering AND the Green Space program + a tree walkSam & PabloPablo will be LIVE from Salem’s Northgate Park
11:30 a.m.EDI + FOT; plus, Adult Urban Forestry Training ProgramSam & SurabhiDharma Rain Zen Center, NE Portland
1:00 p.m.Neighborhood Trees Program + tree walkWhitneyNorth Portland
3:00Eugene treesErikStreets of Eugene
4:00Giving, Give!Guide, tree quiz for ToniSam & G!G’s Toni TNE Portland

Please keep in mind that all events are subject to change due to weather and other issues beyond our control. Check back for agenda changes!

So, YES, today is a great day to give! Of course, #GivingTuesday is all about giving. And if you give $10+ today through Willamette Week’s Give!Guide you could win one of five “Nonprofit #PDXgivesback” packages which include a $100 gift card to New Seasons Market, $100 gift card to Paloma Clothing, and a bundle of goodies from participating nonprofits.  AND, if You’re 35 or Under you get an extra chance of winning! One “Nonprofit #PDXgivesback” package is reserved for winning donors under the age of 36! 

Each Giving Tuesday #PDXGivesBack prize package includes:

  • $100 gift card to New Seasons Market
  • $100 gift card to Paloma Clothing
  • $20 gift cards to Portland Mercado from Hacienda CDC
  • Coloring book, tote, and water bottle from Animal Aid
  • Notecard set from Vibe of Portland
  • Pair of silicups or silipints from Willamette Riverkeeper
  • Mug, #wholecommunity canvas tote, and heart-shaped stress ball from Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare
  • Koozie from Friends of Columbia River Gorge
  • Two face masks from Clackamas Women’s Services
  • Adjustable ball cap from Harper’s Playground
  • A tea towel from Portland Fruit Tree Project
  • An anthology and gift certificate for a writing workshop from Write Around Portland
  • A beanie, fandana, and hand sanitizer from Northwest Mothers Milk Bank
  • Totes from Domestic Violence Resource Center
  • A coupon for a free drip coffee from Nossa Familia 
  • Two Washman car washes
  • WW’s Finder

One of the following signature pieces has been added to each prize package: 

  1. A rare pair of lifetime tickets to Portland Playhouse
  2. In Kind gift box with 14 essentials that would be great to add to your hospital bag for delivery, diaper bag, or baby’s nursery
  3. Women in Science Portland tote and picnic blanket
  4. Friends of Trees hoodie (hey, that’s from us!  )

 

NOW is the time to get a tree

 

Tree lovers, we need your help! Not only have our community tree planting events changed quite a bit due to COVID, health & safety measures mean we have very limited ability to visit communities and help neighbors get a tree of their own.

Normally we reach thousands of potential tree recipients with door-to-door canvassers and through tabling at community events – things we just can’t do this season.

Less interpersonal interaction means we won’t reach enough households about getting trees planted. And reaching fewer households means that, without your help, our neighborhoods will have far fewer new trees – and we need trees more than ever!

Here’s how you can help:

  • Get a tree planted at your home. If you’ve been thinking about getting a tree, now’s the time.
  • Talk to your neighbors about getting a tree. How many tree-less front yards are on your street? How about tree-less planting strips? (the area between the sidewalk and street). Visit your neighbors (masked, of course 😉 and help spread the good word about trees through forwarding this email or sharing this link.

Getting a tree with Friends of Trees is easy, informative, and affordable!

  • The cost to you for a tree is a very affordable $35. Considering that tree would sell in a nursery for much more, plus when it’s from Friends of Trees you get delivery, a hole dug, expert planters, and post-planting support, it’s a great deal!
  • We have a sliding scale available if $35 is too much – name your price! And if you can afford more than $35 anything extra will go to our tree scholarship fund.
  • Your tree can be FREE if need be, thanks to our tree scholarship fund (donate to the tree scholarship fund here!)

Check out how easy it is to get a tree, and our wide variety of trees, here.

Questions? Email or call the Tree Team at (503)595-0212. We can’t wait to introduce you to your new tree!

Please note that this information applies to the Portland Metro area; for information about getting a tree in our Eugene service area please contact our Eugene office.

This information was featured in the September 2020 edition of Treemail, our monthly e-news; read the whole issue here, and catch up on other Treemail issues here.

Simple ways to protect your tree on windy days

The Pacific Northwest is experiencing a historic windstorm event in September, 2020. These winds can cause serious damage to both young and established trees. When the winds pick up, you can take some simple steps to prevent damage to your tree friend.

What should I do to protect my trees from wind?

Watering your trees on windy days can help reduce or prevent damage to leaves.

1. Wind causes leaves to dry out more quickly. That’s why it’s important to make sure tree roots have access to water in the soil to replenish the water lost through their leaves. If trees don’t have enough access to water in the soil, the leaves can dry out, and potentially cause dieback.

  • Newly planted trees (1-5 years since planting): Make sure to give young trees a nice, deep soaking of the root zone with about 10-15 gallons of water. That’s three large buckets of water, slowly added to the soil. Make sure you soak all of the soil within two feet of the trunk, and imagine you are trying to reach the roots about a foot deep in the soil.
  • Established trees (5+ years): This is a great job for a soaker hose or sprinkler, slowly moistening the soil around the edge of the canopy of the tree. Some mature trees are already experiencing drought stress, so it’s extra important to give them an extra drink during windy periods.

2. You can try to protect the leaves with windbreak.

If it’s possible to establish a windbreak, or to attach a frost cloth securely to your tree’s canopy, this can protect your tree from harsh winds. Friends of Trees cautions against this simply because young trees don’t have established root systems, and a fabric covering might act as a wind sail. You may just end up sending your tree on an unintended journey across your yard. Use your best judgement.

 

Wind can cause water to exit leaves too quickly, causing damage to the leaves or canopy dieback on this Seven Son Flower tree.

Why does my tree lose water through its leaves?

Water loss through leaves is due to a process called transpiration, which is essentially the process that occurs after your tree takes up water from the soil, uses it for photosynthesis, and then releases it back into the air. The US Geological Survey explains it this way:

“The typical plant, including any found in a landscape, absorbs water from the soil through its roots. That water is then used for metabolic and physiologic functions. The water eventually is released to the atmosphere as vapor via the plant’s stomata — tiny, closeable, pore-like structures on the surfaces of leaves.”

That water (H2O), of course, plays an important role in photosynthesis while inside the plant, reacting with carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce some delicious sugars for the plant to eat (C6H12O6) and some complimentary fresh oxygen (O2) for us!

So, why does the wind cause tree leaves to dry out more quickly?

Because water likes to distribute itself evenly, it will tend to move from a moist location to a drier location. If the inside of the leaf is moist, and the outside air is also moist, water won’t feel the need to jump ship.

But, as Wikipedia explains, “wind blows away much of this water vapor near the leaf surface…speeding up the diffusion of water molecules into the surrounding air.” The wind moves the moisture away from the leaf, encouraging more water to exit the leaf and re-moisten the surrounding air.

So, keep an eye out for dry/windy weather in the forecast, and make sure your trees and plants are prepared. And give special attention to evergreens in windy/dry periods during the winter, as these trees with year-round leaves and needles will transpire year-round as well.